Something to Consider…”Dying Careers You Should Avoid”

Dying Career #1: Desktop Publisher
Desktop publishing was revolutionary during the printed media era, helping organizations avoid the cost and complications of using large printing presses to print everything from advertisements to magazines. Today, desktop publishers still design layouts with computer software for newspapers, books, and other printed media, says the U.S. Department of Labor, but the printing party has come to an end.

Projected Decline: According to the Department of Labor, desktop publisher jobs are expected to decline by 15 percent from 2010 to 2020. That’s a total of 3,300 lost jobs, which is sizable considering the profession had only 22,600 jobs in 2010.

Why It’s Dying: The Department says that advances in user-friendly desktop publishing software will allow other workers, such as graphic designers and copyeditors, to perform the tasks desktop publishers do now. Automation will also lead to job loss. Finally, the Department says, opportunities in desktop publishing will be stronger “for those with a degree in graphic design or a related field.”

Which begs the question: Why not consider…

Alternative Career: Graphic Designer

Not only does the career of graphic designer have a better outlook for job growth, according to the Department, it also gives you the opportunity to be more creative. That’s because graphic designers use computer software, and sometimes even draw by hand, to create visual concepts for logos, websites, or product illustrations.

Projected Growth: The Department projects graphic designer jobs to grow by 13 percent from 2010 to 2020, which translates to 37,300 possible new jobs.

Why It’s Growing: The Department says that due to the increased use of the Internet, graphic designers will be needed to create layouts and images for such things as websites, electronic publications, portable devices, and video entertainment media.

“Companies need artists to create packaging, branding, marketing/PR materials, trade show/billboard signage, online and print advertising, gaming development artists, and many are anxious to [hire graphic designers]” says Cheryl Chapman, a professor of digital graphic art with Coastline Community College in Southern California.

Education Options: Typically, a bachelor’s degree in graphic design or a related field is a must for graphic designers, says the Department. “However, those with a bachelor’s degree in another field may pursue  technical training in graphic design to meet most hiring qualifications,” says the Department.

Link to entire article.